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Title: Damping of flexural vibrations in glass fibre composite plates and honeycomb sandwich panels containing indentations of power-law profile
Authors: Bowyer, E.P.
Nash, Peter
Krylov, Victor V.
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: © Acoustical Society of America (Published by the Acoustical Society of America through the American Institute of Physics)
Citation: BOWYER, E.P., NASH, P. and KRYLOV, V.V., 2013. Damping of flexural vibrations in glass fibre composite plates and honeycomb sandwich panels containing indentations of power-law profile. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics - 164th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Kansas City, Missouri, 22-26 October 2012, 18, 030004, 13pp.
Abstract: In this paper, the results of the experimental investigation into the addition of indentations of power-law profile into composite plates and panels and their subsequent inclusion into composite honeycomb sandwich panels are reported. The composite plates in question are sheets of composite with visible indentations of power-law profile. A panel is a sheet of composite with the indentations encased within the sample. This makes a panel similar in surface texture to an un-machined composite sheet (reference plate) or conventional honeycomb sandwich panel. In the case of quadratic or higher-order profiles, the above-mentioned indentations act as two-dimensional acoustic black holes (ABH) for flexural waves that can absorb a large proportion of the incident wave energy. For all the composite samples tested in this investigation, the addition of two-dimensional acoustic black holes resulted in further increase in damping of resonant vibrations, in addition to the already substantial inherent damping due to large values of the loss factor for composites. Due to large values of the loss factor for composite materials, there was no need to use attached absorbing layers to implement the acoustic black hole effect.
Description: This article was published in the Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics - 164th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America [© Acoustical Society of America]. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1121/1.4776154
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/11509
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4776154
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering)

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