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Title: Integrating deconstruction into the project delivery process
Authors: Isiadinso, Chinwe
Keywords: Deconstruction
Project delivery process
DFD
Sustainable construction
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: © Chinwe Isiadinso
Abstract: Considering deconstruction as a means of achieving sustainable construction, would enable the construction industry to address some of its environmental problems. In addition, the growing pressure from the public and legislation for environmental considerations, means that there is now a need for the construction industry to increasingly consider the recycling and reuse of building components used in constructing buildings. The deconstruction of buildings provides the construction industry with the opportunities to effectively deal with its unsustainable construction practices. One of the approaches taken by industry to facilitate the adoption of deconstruction is designing a building with the intention of disassembly instead of demolition at the end of its useful life. This concept is known as Design for Deconstruction (DFD). Although some research works have been undertaken to support and establish deconstruction into current construction practice, there is little or no guidance for practitioners on how best to do this. This need to fully integrate the concept of design for deconstruction into the current project delivery process is the basis of this research. In order to contextualise, corroborate and develop the research, a review of existing literature on sustainable construction and deconstruction was undertaken. Following from the review of literature, a survey and case study were undertaken to explore the current practice of deconstruction and investigate a practical example of sustainable construction practice that reflects the integration of deconstruction principles within the building process. The findings from the review of literature, the survey and case study were used to develop a mechanism for integrating deconstruction into the building process. The mechanism is a process model for the construction industry to implement the concept of DFD from inception to completion of a building project and throughout a building's lifecycle. Evaluation of the developed process model was carried out by industry practitioners to assess its suitability and practicability. The feedback from the evaluation established that the process model is effective in enabling some aspects of sustainability principles such as designing to minimise waste and encouraging the reuse and recycle of building materials and components. Several benefits and potentials of the process model were also identified. Considering deconstruction as a means of achieving sustainable construction, would enable the construction industry to address some of its environmental problems. In addition, the growing pressure from the public and legislation for environmental considerations, means that there is now a need for the construction industry to increasingly consider the recycling and reuse of building components used in constructing buildings. The deconstruction of buildings provides the construction industry with the opportunities to effectively deal with its unsustainable construction practices. One of the approaches taken by industry to facilitate the adoption of deconstruction is designing a building with the intention of disassembly instead of demolition at the end of its useful life. This concept is known as Design for Deconstruction (DFD). Although some research works have been undertaken to support and establish deconstruction into current construction practice, there is little or no guidance for practitioners on how best to do this. This need to fully integrate the concept of design for deconstruction into the current project delivery process is the basis of this research. In order to contextualise, corroborate and develop the research, a review of existing literature on sustainable construction and deconstruction was undertaken. Following from the review of literature, a survey and case study were undertaken to explore the current practice of deconstruction and investigate a practical example of sustainable construction practice that reflects the integration of deconstruction principles within the building process. The findings from the review of literature, the survey and case study were used to develop a mechanism for integrating deconstruction into the building process. The mechanism is a process model for the construction industry to implement the concept of DFD from inception to completion of a building project and throughout a building's lifecycle. Evaluation of the developed process model was carried out by industry practitioners to assess its suitability and practicability. The feedback from the evaluation established that the process model is effective in enabling some aspects of sustainability principles such as designing to minimise waste and encouraging the reuse and recycle of building materials and components. Several benefits and potentials of the process model were also identified.Considering deconstruction as a means of achieving sustainable construction, would enable the construction industry to address some of its environmental problems. In addition, the growing pressure from the public and legislation for environmental considerations, means that there is now a need for the construction industry to increasingly consider the recycling and reuse of building components used in constructing buildings. The deconstruction of buildings provides the construction industry with the opportunities to effectively deal with its unsustainable construction practices. One of the approaches taken by industry to facilitate the adoption of deconstruction is designing a building with the intention of disassembly instead of demolition at the end of its useful life. This concept is known as Design for Deconstruction (DFD). Although some research works have been undertaken to support and establish deconstruction into current construction practice, there is little or no guidance for practitioners on how best to do this. This need to fully integrate the concept of design for deconstruction into the current project delivery process is the basis of this research. In order to contextualise, corroborate and develop the research, a review of existing literature on sustainable construction and deconstruction was undertaken. Following from the review of literature, a survey and case study were undertaken to explore the current practice of deconstruction and investigate a practical example of sustainable construction practice that reflects the integration of deconstruction principles within the building process. The findings from the review of literature, the survey and case study were used to develop a mechanism for integrating deconstruction into the building process. The mechanism is a process model for the construction industry to implement the concept of DFD from inception to completion of a building project and throughout a building's lifecycle. Evaluation of the developed process model was carried out by industry practitioners to assess its suitability and practicability. The feedback from the evaluation established that the process model is effective in enabling some aspects of sustainability principles such as designing to minimise waste and encouraging the reuse and recycle of building materials and components. Several benefits and potentials of the process model were also identified. Thus, in this research, it can be concluded that integrating the concept of deconstruction into the construction project delivery process can assist the industry to better reuse and recycle building materials and achieve a sustainable environment. Furthermore, the expected impact of the research on the construction industry is a practical process model that can be used to incorporate the concept of deconstruction into the project delivery process. This can be adopted at all the stages of the building process and would benefit the industry as it offers a solution to reduce the environmental impacts caused by its activities.
Description: A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy of Loughborough University.
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/11774
Appears in Collections:PhD Theses (Civil and Building Engineering)

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