Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/11892

Title: The impact of verbal interaction on driver lateral control: an experimental assessment
Authors: Gkikas, Nikolaos
Richardson, John H.
Keywords: Cognitive distraction
Auditory interfaces
Auditory distraction
Game-based simulation
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: © Taylor & Francis
Citation: GKIKAS, N. and RICHARDSON, J., 2011. The impact of verbal interaction on driver lateral control: an experimental assessment. Behaviour and Information Technology, 31 (6), pp. 605-616.
Abstract: Driver distraction is acknowledged as one of the key contributors to driver accidents (Treat, J.R., et al., 197747. Treat, J. R. 1977. Tri-level study of the causes of traffic accidents (No. DOT-HS-034-535-77-TAC(1)), Bloomington, IN: Institute for Research in Public Safety – Indiana University. View all references. Tri-level study of the causes of traffic accidents (No. DOT-HS-034‐535‐77-TAC(1)). Bloomington, IN: Institute for Research in Public Safety – Indiana University; Knipling, R.R., et al., 199328. Knipling, R. R. 1993. Assessment of IVHS countermeasures for collision avoidance: Rear-end crashes (No. DOT HS 807 995), Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. View all references. Assessment of IVHS countermeasures for collision avoidance: Rear-end crashes (No. DOT HS 807 995). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). As driving is mainly considered a visual task (Wierwille, W.W., 199353. Wierwille, W. W. 1993. “Visual and manual demands of in-car controls and displays”. In Automotive ergonomics, Edited by: Peakock, B. and Karwowski, W. 229–320. London: Taylor and Francis. View all references. Visual and manual demands of in-car controls and displays. In: B. Peakock and W. Karwowski, eds. Automotive ergonomics. London: Taylor and Francis, 229–320) the use of auditory channels for interacting with intelligent vehicle systems has been suggested as a solution to possible visual overload. This article presents two studies which assess the potential impact of distraction caused by verbal interaction on the driving task. The first study used a low-cost, game-based, simulation and the second study used the same experimental design with a generic driving simulation, the Lane Change Task (Mattes, S., 2003. The lane change task as a tool for driver distraction evaluation. In: H. Strasser, H. Rascher, and H. Bubb, eds. Quality of work and products in enterprises of the future. Stuttgart: Ergonomia Verlag, 57–60). Twenty-four young adults, 12 males and 12 females, participated in the first study and 12 young adults, 6 males and 6 females, in the second study. Road departures, time/speed and subjective workload were the measures in the first study, while the second study used mean course-departure and subjective workload as dependent variables. The results indicated that game-based simulation can be a solution when realism is needed but resources are limited, and suggested that concurrent verbal interaction may impair lateral vehicle control.
Description: Closed access. This article was published in the journal, Behaviour and Information Technology [© Taylor & Francis] and the definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144929X.2010.518247
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1080/0144929X.2010.518247
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/11892
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144929X.2010.518247
ISSN: 1362-3001
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Design School)

Files associated with this item:

File Description SizeFormat
Gkikas et al - BIT.pdfPublished version1.04 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

 

SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.