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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/13396

Title: Innovation in cleaner production through waste recycling in composites
Authors: Osmani, Mohamed
Keywords: Cement composites
Composite materials
Concrete composites
Glass reinforced plastic waste
Landfill diversion
Recycling
Rubber composites
Waste recovery
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Citation: OSMANI, M., 2012. Innovation in cleaner production through waste recycling in composites. Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, 24 (1), pp. 6 - 15
Abstract: Purpose: At present Glass Reinforced Plastic (GRP) waste recycling is very limited due to its intrinsic thermoset composite nature and non-availability of viable recovery options. The purpose of this paper is to assess the recycling potential of GRP waste powder and fibre in concrete, cement and rubber composites. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the suitability of GRP waste in concrete, cement, and rubber composites. GRP waste samples were processed and suitable tests were performed to measure the mechanical properties of the resulting three composites. Findings: The findings of this experimental investigation confirmed that GRP waste can be used as a partial replacement for virgin and raw materials in composites. Furthermore, the addition of GRP waste powder and fibre to composites has the potential to improve their mechanical properties. Research limitations/implications: Results show that the use of GRP waste powder in concrete and rubber composites and GRP waste fibre in architectural cladding panels has technical, economic and environmental benefits. As such, the findings of this research pave the way for viable technological options for substituting quality raw materials by GRP waste in pan-industry composites and improving their mechanical properties. However, resulting recycled composites depend upon the consistency and quality of GRP waste powder and fibre, and the access to specialised composite material manufacturing facilities. Furthermore, full compliance tests including durability studies and requirements, which may depend upon specific applications, are recommended. Practical implications: The adopted methodological approach of this research and subsequent experimental results pave the way for viable technological options for substituting quality raw materials by GRP waste in pan-industry composites. It is anticipated that the results of this research would help diverting GRP waste from landfill to more useful industrial applications. Originality/value: Growing technological innovations, ample market value and demand for GRP composites all over the world has trigged interest in optimising GRP waste recovery. However, few solutions for GRP waste recycling into value-added industrial products are being explored. The work reported so far is very limited and did not show viable applications for GRP waste composites. Hence, this research sets out to examine the suitability of GRP waste powder and fibre in concrete, cement, and rubber composites. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Description: This article was published in the serial Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal [© Emerald Group Publishing Limited]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14777831311291104
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1108/14777831311291104
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/13396
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14777831311291104
ISSN: 1477-7835
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Civil and Building Engineering)

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