Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/17585

Title: Human effect on twin antenna on-body for three diversity techniques at 2.4 GHz
Authors: Al-Saffar, D.
Edwards, R.M.
Ojerinde, Oluwaseun
Panagamuwa, C.J.
Seager, R.D.
Keywords: On-body channels
Body area networks
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: IEEE © EurAAP
Citation: AL-SAFFAR, D. ... et al., 2015. Human effect on twin antenna on-body for three diversity techniques at 2.4 GHz. IN: Proceedings of the 9th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation, Lisbon, Portugal, 12-17 April 2015.
Abstract: Since the user is generally in the near field On-body antennas are accepted as more complex to optimise than their free space counterparts. Use of the body as a platform for wearable electronics is a topical subject. Omnidirectional antennas are thought to be useful for antennas in body area networks. However, the desirable properties of omnidirectional radiation patterns close to humans are severely diminished due to the lossy load nature of biological matter and high levels of scattering due to shadowing and mismatch. To alleviate these problems two or more antennas can be used on the body. In this paper, two on body antennas are used with three different combination techniques in order to evaluate the diversity performance and then compared with their free space equivalents. Three diversity techniques are used – Selective, Maximal Ratio and Equal Gain. The frequency of operation was 2.4GHz.
Description: The conference website is at: http://www.eucap2015.org/
Version: Accepted for publication
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/17585
Appears in Collections:Conference Papers and Contributions (Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering)

Files associated with this item:

File Description SizeFormat
edas.final-1570043851.pdfAccepted version1.71 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.