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Title: Non-suicidal self-injury in trans people: associations with psychological symptoms, victimization, interpersonal functioning and perceived social support
Authors: Claes, L.
Bouman, Walter P.
Witcomb, Gemma L.
Thurnston, Megan
Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando
Arcelus, Jon
Keywords: Trans
Transsexualism
Gender dysphoria
NSSI
Victimization
Interpersonal functioning
Social support
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Wiley / © International Society for Sexual Medicine
Citation: CLAES, L. ... et al, 2015. Non-suicidal self-injury in trans people: associations with psychological symptoms, victimization, interpersonal functioning and perceived social support. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 12 (1), pp. 168-179.
Abstract: Abstract Introduction.There is a paucity of systematic research in the area of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in trans people. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NSSI in trans people and the associations with intra- and interpersonal problems. Methods Participants were 155 untreated individuals with a diagnosis of transsexualism (according to International Classification of Disease-10 criteria) attending a national gender identity clinic. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed the Self-Injury Questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Hamburg Body Drawing Scale, the Experiences of Transphobia Scale, the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-32, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Results The sample consisted of 66.5% trans women and 33.5% trans men and 36.8% of them had a history of engaging in NSSI. The prevalence of NSSI was significantly higher in trans men (57.7%) compared with trans women (26.2%). Trans individuals with NSSI reported more psychological and interpersonal problems and perceived less social support compared with trans individuals without NSSI. Moreover, the probability of having experienced physical harassment related to being trans was highest in trans women with NSSI (compared with those without NSSI). The study found that with respect to psychological symptoms, trans women reported significantly more intrapersonal and interpersonal symptoms compared with trans men. Finally, the results of the regression analysis showed that the probability of engaging in NSSI by trans individuals was significantly positively related to a younger age, being trans male, and reporting more psychological symptoms. Conclusions The high levels of NSSI behavior and its association with interpersonal and interpersonal difficulties and lack of social support need to be taken into consideration when assessing trans individuals. The effect of cross-sex hormones and sex reassignment surgery on psychological functioning, including NSSI behavior, as part of the transitional journey of trans individuals should be explored in future studies
Description: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: CLAES, L. ... et al, 2015. Non-suicidal self-injury in trans people: associations with psychological symptoms, victimization, interpersonal functioning and perceived social support. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 12 (1), pp. 168-179, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsm.12711. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1111/jsm.12711
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/18997
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsm.12711
ISSN: 1743-6109
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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