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Title: Association between psychological distress and mortality: individual participant pooled analysis of 10 prospective cohort studies
Authors: Russ, Tom C.
Stamatakis, Emmanuel
Hamer, Mark
Starr, John M.
Kivimaki, Mika
Batty, G. David
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: © The Authors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: RUSS, T. ...et al., 2012. Association between psychological distress and mortality: individual participant pooled analysis of 10 prospective cohort studies. BMJ, 345:e4933.
Abstract: Abstract Objective To quantify the link between lower, subclinically symptomatic, levels of psychological distress and cause-specific mortality in a large scale, population based study. Design Individual participant meta-analysis of 10 large prospective cohort studies from the Health Survey for England. Baseline psychological distress measured by the 12 item General Health Questionnaire score, and mortality from death certification. Participants 68 222 people from general population samples of adults aged 35 years and over, free of cardiovascular disease and cancer, and living in private households in England at study baseline. Main outcome measures Death from all causes (n=8365), cardiovascular disease including cerebrovascular disease (n=3382), all cancers (n=2552), and deaths from external causes (n=386). Mean follow-up was 8.2 years (standard deviation 3.5). Results We found a dose-response association between psychological distress across the full range of severity and an increased risk of mortality (age and sex adjusted hazard ratio for General Health Questionnaire scores of 1-3 v score 0: 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 1.27; scores 4-6: 1.43, 1.31 to 1.56; and scores 7-12: 1.94, 1.66 to 2.26; P<0.001 for trend). This association remained after adjustment for somatic comorbidity plus behavioural and socioeconomic factors. A similar association was found for cardiovascular disease deaths and deaths from external causes. Cancer death was only associated with psychological distress at higher levels. Conclusions Psychological distress is associated with increased risk of mortality from several major causes in a dose-response pattern. Risk of mortality was raised even at lower levels of distress.
Description: This is an Open Access Article. It is published by the BMJ Publishing Group under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e4933
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/19198
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e4933
ISSN: 1756-1833
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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