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Title: Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools.
Authors: Clemes, Stacy A.
Barber, Sally E.
Bingham, Daniel D.
Ridgers, Nicola
Fletcher, Elly
Pearson, Natalie
Salmon, Jo
Dunstan, David W.
Keywords: ActivPAL
Ethnic diversity
Health pilot
Controlled trial
Sedentary behaviour
Socioeconomic status
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health
Citation: CLEMES, S.A. ...et al., 2015. Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools. Journal of Public Health, 38 (3), pp. 526-533.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: This research examined the influence of sit-to-stand desks on classroom sitting time in primary school children. METHODS: Pilot controlled trials with similar intervention strategies were conducted in primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, and Bradford, UK. Sit-to-stand desks replaced all standard desks in the Australian intervention classroom. Six sit-to-stand desks replaced a bank of standard desks in the UK intervention classroom. Children were exposed to the sit-to-stand desks for 9-10 weeks. Control classrooms retained their normal seated desks. Classroom sitting time was measured at baseline and follow-up using the activPAL3 inclinometer. RESULTS: Thirty UK and 44 Australian children provided valid activPAL data at baseline and follow-up. The proportion of time spent sitting in class decreased significantly at follow-up in both intervention groups (UK: -9.8 ± 16.5% [-52.4 ± 66.6 min/day]; Australian: -9.4 ± 10% [-43.7 ± 29.9 min/day]). No significant changes in classroom sitting time were observed in the UK control group, while a significant reduction was observed in the Australian control group (-5.9 ± 11.7% [-28.2 ± 28.3 min/day]). CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of implementation, incorporating sit-to-stand desks into classrooms appears to be an effective way of reducing classroom sitting in this diverse sample of children. Longer term efficacy trials are needed to determine effects on children's health and learning.
Description: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Public Health following peer review. The version of record CLEMES, S.A. ...et al., 2015. Reducing children's classroom sitting time using sit-to-stand desks: findings from pilot studies in UK and Australian primary schools. Journal of Public Health, In Press. is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdv084
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdv084
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/19729
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdv084
ISSN: 1741-3842
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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