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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20068

Title: The role of working hours, work environment and physical leisure activity on the need for recovery following a day's work among UK white-water raft guides: a within-subjects multilevel approach
Authors: Wilson, Iain
McDermott, Hilary
Munir, Fehmidah
Keywords: Psychological well-being
Need for recovery
Hours worked
Physical leisure activity
Natural outdoor environment
Longitudinal
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: © Elsevier Ltd
Citation: WILSON, I., MCDERMOTT, H. and MUNIR, F., 2016. The role of working hours, work environment and physical leisure activity on the need for recovery following a day's work among UK white-water raft guides: a within-subjects multilevel approach. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 23, pp. 123 - 131.
Abstract: Background: White-water raft guides are a growing workforce of the outdoor sector but little is known about how the working environment, workload and physical leisure activity impacts on the need for occupational recovery (the desire to replenish internal resources and recuperate in the time immediately following work) of those working in this physically demanding occupation. Methods: Longitudinal data were collected across an eight month working season at three month intervals. Multilevel analyses tested the within-subject associations between work environment, hours worked and physical leisure activity had on the need for recovery. Results: Working longer across the working season and participating in more physical leisure activity were directly associated with a lower need for occupational recovery. Furthermore, working on natural rivers significantly reduced the need for recovery experienced compared to work on man-made courses. This was regardless of the number of hours of worked in these environments. Discussion: Physical leisure activity may provide a distraction from work, allowing employees to replenish their physical and psychological energy, thus protecting themselves against work-related fatigue. The findings also expand upon the previous literature identifying that working in a natural environment reduces the risk of experiencing work-related fatigue.
Description: This paper is embargoed until June 2017.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2015.12.004
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20068
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2015.12.004
ISSN: 1469-0292
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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