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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20480

Title: Effect of breakfast omission on energy intake and evening exercise performance
Authors: Clayton, David J.
Barutcu, Asya
Machin, Claire
Stensel, David J.
James, Lewis J.
Keywords: Appetite
Energy restriction
Energy balance
Meal omission
Ghrelin
GLP-1
Exercise
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: © Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
Citation: CLAYTON, D.J. ... et al., 2015. Effect of breakfast omission on energy intake and evening exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 (12), pp. 2645-2652.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Breakfast omission may reduce daily energy intake. Exercising fasted impairs performance compared with exercising after breakfast, but the effect breakfast omission has on evening exercise performance is unknown. This study assessed the effect of omitting breakfast on evening exercise performance and within-day energy intake. METHODS: Ten male, habitual breakfast eaters completed two trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Subjects arrived at the laboratory in an overnight-fasted state and either consumed or omitted a 733 ± 46 kcal (3095 ± 195 kJ) breakfast. Ad libitum energy intake was assessed at 4.5 h (lunch) and 11 h (dinner). At 9 h, subjects completed a 30-min cycling exercise at approximately 60% V·O2peak, followed by a 30-min maximal cycling performance test. Food was not permitted for subjects once they left the laboratory after dinner until 0800 h the following morning. Acylated ghrelin, GLP-1(7–36), glucose, and insulin were assessed at 0, 4.5, and 9 h. Subjective appetite sensations were recorded throughout. RESULTS: Energy intake was 199 ± 151 kcal greater at lunch (P < 0.01) after breakfast omission compared with that after breakfast consumption and tended to be greater at dinner after consuming breakfast (P = 0.052). Consequently, total ad libitum energy intake was similar between trials (P = 0.196), with 24-h energy intake 19% ± 5% greater after consuming breakfast (P < 0.001). Total work completed during the exercise performance test was 4.5% greater after breakfast (314 ± 53 vs 300 ± 56 kJ; P < 0.05). Insulin was greater during breakfast consumption at 4.5 h (P < 0.05), with no other interaction effect for hormone concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Breakfast omission might be an effective means of reducing daily energy intake but may impair performance later that day, even after consuming lunch.
Description: This is a non-final version of an article published in final form as: Clayton, D.J. ... et al., 2015. Effect of breakfast omission on energy intake and evening exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 (12), pp. 2645-2652.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000702
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20480
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000000702
ISSN: 0195-9131
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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