Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20791

Title: Friction surface structure of a Cf/C-SiC composite brake disc after bedding testing on a full-scale dynamometer
Authors: Bian, Guangyu
Wu, Houzheng
Keywords: Carbon-ceramic brake disc
Friction surface
Transferred materials
Friction layer microstructure
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: © Elsevier
Citation: BIAN, G. and WU, H., 2016. Friction surface structure of a Cf/C-SiC composite brake disc after bedding testing on a full-scale dynamometer. Tribology International, 99, pp.85–95
Abstract: We have examined friction surface structure of a carbon ceramic brake disc tested on a full-scale dynamometer with microscopy techniques. The bedded friction surface is composed of two types of regions: transferred materials (TM) and SiC. The TM regions were formed through the deposition of wear debris into surface voids, followed by compaction and crystallite refinement during braking. A thin friction layer (FL) was developed on top of TM and SiC regions with nano-sized copper/iron oxide crystallites as the primary constituent. Analysis shows that debris generated from pad is the main source of TM and FL. No evidence shows chemical diffusion bonding between TM and composite constituent. On silicon carbide surface, dislocations were activated as the sources of surface fracture.
Description: This paper is closed access until 18th March 2017.
Sponsor: This work was sponsored by the Technology Strategy Broad (TSB), UK.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1016/j.triboint.2016.03.010
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/20791
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.triboint.2016.03.010
ISSN: 0301-679X
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Materials)

Files associated with this item:

File Description SizeFormat
Author version.pdfAccepted version2.09 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

 

SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.