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Title: The effect of school bag design and load on spinal posture during stair use by children
Authors: Hong, Youlian
Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui
Li, Jing-Xian
Keywords: Biomechanics
Load-bearing
Carrying
Children
Orthopaedics
Gait
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: © Taylor & Francis
Citation: HONG, Y., FONG, D. and LI, J., 2011. The effect of school bag design and load on spinal posture during stair use by children. Ergonomics, 54 (12), pp.1207-1213.
Abstract: Thirteen male children ascending and descending stairs with loads that equalled 0%, 10%, 15% and 20% of their body weight were the subject of our research: the boys were wearing an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag or a symmetrical double-strap backpack during our experiments with them. The maximum spinal tilt to the loading side and to the support side, and the range of spinal motions, were obtained by using a motion analysis system. Our results showed that symmetry of spinal posture was observed both when they ascended staircase with all loads and descended in a backpack. When carrying an athletic bag with 15% and 20% of their body weight while ascending the staircase, the lateral spinal tilt to the supporting side was significantly increased. We concluded that a symmetrical backpack with a load not exceeding 20% or an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag with a load not exceeding 10% should be recommended for school children in order to promote safer staircase use. Statement of Relevance: Children carrying heavy school bags may develop spinal problems. This study suggested that when they are using stairs, a symmetrical backpack with a load within 20% body weight is acceptable for them. When they are carrying an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag, the bag's weight should not exceed 10% of the body weight in order to avoid excessive spinal tilt.
Description: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Ergonomics on 22/11/2011, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.615415.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2011.615415
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/21245
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.615415
ISSN: 0014-0139
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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