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Title: Myth maker: Malcolm Bradbury and the creation of Creative Writing at UEA
Authors: Jaillant, Lise
Keywords: Creative writing in literature courses
Literary prizes
Writing communities
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: © Taylor & Francis
Citation: JAILLANT, L., 2017. Myth maker: Malcolm Bradbury and the creation of Creative Writing at UEA. New Writing, DOI: 10.1080/14790726.2016.1192196
Abstract: When did creative writing courses really appear in the UK? The usual story is that the first creative writing programme was launched in 1970 at the University of East Anglia, under the leadership of Malcolm Bradbury. Ian McEwan is often presented as the first student in creative writing, a role he has always rejected – insisting that he studied for an MA in literature with the option to submit creative work for the final dissertation. As Kathryn Holeywell has shown, creative writing was already offered for assessment at UEA in the 1960s. This article tells a more complete history of creative writing in Britain, a history that takes into account the experimentations of the 1960s and the rise of literary prizes in the 1980s – without ignoring Bradbury’s important role.
Description: Closed access until January 2018.
Sponsor: The research for this article was funded by the Malcolm Bradbury Memorial Trust Fund and an Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship at the Lilly Library (Indiana University).
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1080/14790726.2016.1192196
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/21388
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14790726.2016.1192196
ISSN: 1943-3107
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (English and Drama)

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