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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/22185

Title: Human derived feeder fibroblasts for the culture of epithelial cells for clinical use
Authors: O’Callaghan, A.R.
Morgan, L.
Daniels, J.T.
Lewis, Mark P.
Keywords: Cornea
Oral mucosa
Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency
Stem cell therapy
Limbal fibroblasts
Oral mucosal fibroblasts
Limbal epithelial cells
Oral mucosal epithelial cells
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: © Future Medicine
Citation: O'CALLAGHAN, A.R. ...et al., Human derived feeder fibroblasts for the culture of epithelial cells for clinical use. Regenerative Medicine, 11 (6), pp. 529-543.
Abstract: Aim: To investigate human oral mucosal fibroblasts (HOMF) and human limbal fibroblasts (HLF) as alternatives to murine 3T3 feeder fibroblasts currently used to support epithelial cell expansion for the treatment of limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency. Methods: HLF and HOMF were compared to 3T3 for their ability to support the culture of human limbal epithelial cells (HLE) and human oral mucosal epithelial cells. Results: HOMF, but not HLF, were equivalent to 3T3 in terms of the number of epithelial population doublings achieved. HLE co-cultured with HOMF or 3T3 had similar expression of corneal and putative stem cell markers. Conclusion: HOMF are a suitable and safer feeder fibroblast alternative to 3T3 for the production of epithelial cells for clinical use.
Description: This paper is in closed access until August 2017.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.2217/rme-2016-0039
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/22185
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/rme-2016-0039
ISSN: 1746-076X
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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