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Title: How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury
Authors: Soligard, Torbjorn
Schwellnus, Martin
Alonso, Juan-Manuel
Bahr, Roald
Clarsen, Ben
Dijkstra, H. Paul
Gabbett, Tim J.
Gleeson, Michael
Hagglund, Martin
Hutchinson, Mark R.
Janse van Rensburg, Christa
Khan, Karim M.
Meeusen, Romain
Orchard, John W.
Pluim, Babette M.
Raftery, Martin
Budgett, Richard
Engebretsen, Lars
Keywords: Load management
Recovery
Adaptation
Maladaptation
Stress
Training
Competition
Calendar
Congestion
Saturation
Psychosocial stressors
Travel
External load
Internal load
Response
Acute:chronic load ratio
Spikes
Injury
Overuse
Acute
Wellbeing
Fatigue
Fitness
Monitoring
Measurement
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: BMJ
Citation: SOLIGARD, T. ... et al, 2016. How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 (17), pp. 1030-1041.
Abstract: Athletes participating in elite sports are exposed to high training loads and increasingly saturated competition calendars. Emerging evidence indicates that poor load management is a major risk factor for injury. The International Olympic Committee convened an expert group to review the scientific evidence for the relationship of load (defined broadly to include rapid changes in training and competition load, competition calendar congestion, psychological load and travel) and health outcomes in sport. We summarise the results linking load to risk of injury in athletes, and provide athletes, coaches and support staff with practical guidelines to manage load in sport. This consensus statement includes guidelines for (1) prescription of training and competition load, as well as for (2) monitoring of training, competition and psychological load, athlete well-being and injury. In the process, we identified research priorities.
Description: This paper was accepted for publication in the journal British Journal of Sports Medicine and the definitive published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581.
Sponsor: International Olympic Committee
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/22957
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581
ISSN: 0306-3674
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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