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Title: How much is too much? (Part 2) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of illness
Authors: Schwellnus, Martin
Soligard, Torbjørn
Alonso, Juan-Manuel
Bahr, Roald
Clarsen, Ben
Dijkstra, H. Paul
Gabbett, Tim J.
Gleeson, Michael
Hagglund, Martin
Hutchinson, Mark R.
Janse van Rensburg, Christa
Meeusen, Romain
Orchard, John W.
Pluim, Babette M.
Raftery, Martin
Budgett, Richard
Engebretsen, Lars
Keywords: Illness
Overtraining
Overreaching
Infection
Load management
Adaptation
Maladaptation
Stress
Training
Competition
Calendar
Congestion
Saturation
Psychosocial stressors
Travel
External load
Internal load
Wellbeing
Fatigue
Fitness
Monitoring
Measurement
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: BMJ
Citation: SCHWELLNUS, M. ... et al, 2016. How much is too much? (Part 2) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of illness. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 (17), pp. 1043-1052.
Abstract: The modern-day athlete participating in elite sports is exposed to high training loads and increasingly saturated competition calendar. Emerging evidence indicates that inappropriate load management is a significant risk factor for acute illness and the overtraining syndrome. The IOC convened an expert group to review the scientific evidence for the relationship of load - including rapid changes in training and competition load, competition calendar congestion, psychological load and travel - and health outcomes in sport. This paper summarises the results linking load to risk of illness and overtraining in athletes, and provides athletes, coaches and support staff with practical guidelines for appropriate load management to reduce the risk of illness and overtraining in sport. These include guidelines for prescription of training and competition load, as well as for monitoring of training, competition and psychological load, athlete well-being and illness. In the process, urgent research priorities were identified.
Description: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Sponsor: International Olympic Committee
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096572
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/22958
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-096572
ISSN: 0306-3674
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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