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Title: Whey protein consumption after resistance exercise reduces energy intake at a post-exercise meal
Authors: Monteyne, Alistair
Martin, Alex
Jackson, Liam
Corrigan, Nick
Stringer, Ellen
Newey, Jack
Rumbold, Penny L.S.
Stevenson, Emma J.
James, Lewis J.
Keywords: Appetite
Energy balance
Weight management
Protein synthesis
Anabolism
Body composition
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: © The Author(s). This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
Citation: MONTEYNE, A. ... et al., 2016. Whey protein consumption after resistance exercise reduces energy intake at a post-exercise meal. European Journal of Nutrition. First Online: 10 November 2016 DOI: 10.1007/s00394-016-1344-4
Abstract: Purpose: Protein consumption after resistance exercise potentiates muscle protein synthesis, but its effects on subsequent appetite in this context are unknown. This study examined appetite and energy intake following consumption of protein- and carbohydrate-containing drinks after resistance exercise. Methods: After familiarisation, 15 resistance training males (age 21 ± 1 years, body mass 78.0 ± 11.9 kg, stature 1.78 ± 0.07 m) completed two randomised, double-blind trials, consisting of lower-body resistance exercise, followed by consumption of a whey protein (PRO 23.9 ± 3.6 g protein) or dextrose (CHO 26.5 ± 3.8 g carbohydrate) drink in the 5 min post-exercise. An ad libitum meal was served 60 min later, with subjective appetite measured throughout. Drinks were flavoured and matched for energy content and volume. The PRO drink provided 0.3 g/kg body mass protein. Results: Ad libitum energy intake (PRO 3742 ± 994 kJ; CHO 4172 ± 1132 kJ; P = 0.007) and mean eating rate (PRO 339 ± 102 kJ/min; CHO 405 ± 154 kJ/min; P = 0.009) were lower during PRO. The change in eating rate was associated with the change in energy intake (R = 0.661, P = 0.007). No interaction effects were observed for subjective measures of appetite. The PRO drink was perceived as creamier and thicker, and less pleasant, sweet and refreshing (P < 0.05). Conclusion: These results suggest whey protein consumption after resistance exercise reduces subsequent energy intake, and this might be partially mediated by a reduced eating rate. Whilst this reduced energy intake is unlikely to impair hypertrophy, it may be of value in supporting an energy deficit for weight loss.
Description: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1007/s00394-016-1344-4
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/23314
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-016-1344-4
ISSN: 1436-6207
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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