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Title: High-speed laser image analysis of plume angles for pressurised metered dose inhalers: the effect of nozzle geometry
Authors: Chen, Yang
Young, Paul M.
Murphy, Seamus
Fletcher, David F.
Long, Edward J.
Lewis, David
Church, Tanya
Traini, Daniela
Keywords: Aerosol
Electrostatics
Electrostatics nozzle designs
Plume geometry
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Springer © American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists
Citation: CHEN, Y. ... et al, 2016. High-speed laser image analysis of plume angles for pressurised metered dose inhalers: the effect of nozzle geometry. AAPS PharmSciTech, 18 (3), pp. 782–789.
Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate aerosol plume geometries of pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) using a high-speed laser image system with different actuator nozzle materials and designs. Actuators made from aluminium, PET and PTFE were manufactured with four different nozzle designs: cone, flat, curved cone and curved flat. Plume angles and spans generated using the designed actuator nozzles with four solution-based pMDI formulations were imaged using Oxford Lasers EnVision system and analysed using EnVision Patternate software. Reduced plume angles for all actuator materials and nozzle designs were observed with pMDI formulations containing drug with high co-solvent concentration (ethanol) due to the reduced vapour pressure. Significantly higher plume angles were observed with the PTFE flat nozzle across all formulations, which could be a result of the nozzle geometry and material’s hydrophobicity. The plume geometry of pMDI aerosols can be influenced by the vapour pressure of the formulation, nozzle geometries and actuator material physiochemical properties.
Description: The final publication is available at Springer at http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-016-0564-5
Sponsor: This research was supported by the Australian Research Council Linkage Project funding scheme (project number ARC-LP100200156) and Chiesi Ltd, Chippenham, Wiltshire, UK. Professor Traini is the recipient of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (project number FT12010063). Professor Young is the recipient of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (project number FT110100996).
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1208/s12249-016-0564-5
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/23589
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-016-0564-5
ISSN: 1530-9932
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering)

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