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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/24748

Title: A 250-year drought catalogue for the island of Ireland (1765-2015)
Authors: Noone, Simon
Broderick, Ciaran
Duffy, Catriona
Matthews, Tom K.R.
Wilby, Robert L.
Murphy, Conor
Keywords: Drought
Standardized Precipitation Index
Documentary sources
Newspaper archives
Climate reconstructions
Ireland
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Wiley © Royal Meteorological Society
Citation: NOONE, S. ... et al, 2017. A 250-year drought catalogue for the island of Ireland (1765-2015). International Journal of Climatology, 37 (S1), pp. 239–254.
Abstract: This work created a 250-year historic drought catalogue by applying the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) to the Island of Ireland precipitation network (1850–2015) and a reconstructed precipitation series from 1765. Documentary sources from newspaper archives spanning the last 250 years, together with other historical sources are used to (1) add confidence to the quantitative detection of drought episodes and (2) gain insight to the socio-economic impacts of historic droughts. The results show that Ireland is drought prone but recent decades are unrepresentative of the longer-term drought climatology. A large decline in 30-year accumulated SPI-12 values is evident from around the 1990s onwards. During the years 1850–2015 seven major drought rich periods were identified with an island-wide fingerprint in 1854–1860, 1884–1896, 1904–1912, 1921–1923, 1932–1935, 1952–1954 and 1969–1977. These events exhibit substantial diversity in terms of drought development, severity and spatial occurrence. Two exceptionally long events are found in the record: the continuous drought of 1854–1860 and the drought of 1800–1809 (in fact a series of three droughts with brief interludes). Over the last 250 years, droughts have resulted in agricultural hardship, water resource crises and failures and preceded some of the major famines of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This work shows that newspaper archives can be used to trace the progression of drought events and impacts and we thus advocate their wider use in corroborating quantitative assessments. The resulting catalogue challenges prevailing perceptions about drought in Ireland while strengthening the evidence base for future drought and water resource planning across the island.
Description: This paper is closed access until 24th January 2018.
Sponsor: SN was funded by the Irish Research Council. CM, CB and CD acknowledge funding provided by Environmental Protection Agency grant no. 2014-CCRP-MS.16.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1002/joc.4999
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/24748
Publisher Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/joc.4999
ISSN: 1097-0088
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Geography)

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