Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/24878

Title: Sarcopenic obesity, weight loss, and mortality: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Authors: Hamer, Mark
O'Donovan, Gary
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: © American Society for Nutrition
Citation: HAMER, M. and O'DONOVAN, G., 2017. Sarcopenic obesity, weight loss, and mortality: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(1), pp.125-129.
Abstract: Background: Age-related sarcopenia describes loss of muscle strength and often accompanies an increase in adiposity in elderly participants. Objectives: We examined the association of sarcopenic obesity, and changes in muscle strength and weight with risk of mortality. Design: Participants were 6,864 community dwelling men and women (mean±SD age 66.2 ± 6 9.5 years, 45.6% men) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Handgrip strength and body mass index were measured at baseline and at four years follow-up. Individual participant data were linked with death records from National Health Service registries. Sarcopenic obesity was defined as obese individuals (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m2) in the lowest tertile of sex specific grip strength (<35.3 kg men; < 19.6kg women). Results: Over an average follow up of 8 years there were 906 deaths. Compared with the reference group (normal BMI and highest hand grip tertile), the risk of all-cause mortality increased with reducing grip strength within each BMI category. For participants in the lowest hand grip tertile there was little difference in risk between normal BMI (Hazard ratio=3.25; 95% CI, 1.86, 5.65), overweight (2.50;1.44, 4.35), and obese (2.66; 1.86, 3.80), after adjustment for covariates. Compared to participants with stable weight and grip strength, risk of all-cause mortality was significantly greater in those experiencing weight loss over 4 years (2.21;1.32, 3.71) and reduced hand grip strength (1.53;1.07, 2.17), with the highest risk in those with weight loss and reduced strength (3.77; 2.54, 5.60). Conclusion: Sarcopenic obesity did not confer any greater risk than sarcopenia alone. Weight loss in combination with sarcopenia presented the greatest risk of mortality.
Description: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition following peer review. The version of record HAMER, M. and O'DONOVAN, G., 2017. Sarcopenic obesity, weight loss, and mortality: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(1), pp.125-129 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.152488.
Sponsor: Hamer acknowledges support from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, which is a partnership between University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Loughborough University and the University of Leicester.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.117.152488
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/24878
Publisher Link: https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.152488
ISSN: 0002-9165
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

Files associated with this item:

File Description SizeFormat
sarcopenicobese_mortality_paperELSA_AJCN_2017_152488 R2.pdfAccepted version243.31 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

 

SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.