Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/26627

Title: Effects of dietary nitrate supplementation on the response to extremity cooling and endothelial function in individuals with cold sensitivity. A double blind, placebo controlled, crossover, randomised control trial
Authors: Eglin, Clare
Costello, Joseph T.
Bailey, Stephen J.
Gilchrist, Mark
Massey, Heather
Shepherd, Anthony I.
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: © Elsevier
Citation: EGLIN, C. ...et al., 2017. Effects of dietary nitrate supplementation on the response to extremity cooling and endothelial function in individuals with cold sensitivity. A double blind, placebo controlled, crossover, randomised control trial. Nitric Oxide, 70, pp. 76-85.
Abstract: Individuals with cold sensitivity have low peripheral skin blood flow and skin temperature possibly due to reduced nitric oxide (NO•) bioavailability. Beetroot has a high concentration of inorganic nitrate and may increase NO-mediated vasodilation. Using a placebo-controlled, double blind, randomised, crossover design, this study tested the hypotheses that acute beetroot supplementation would increase the rate of cutaneous rewarming following a local cold challenge and augment endothelium-dependent vasodilation in cold sensitive individuals. Thirteen cold sensitive participants completed foot and hand cooling (separately, in 15 °C water for 2 minutes) with spontaneous rewarming in 30°C air whilst skin temperature and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were measured (Baseline). On two further separate visits, participants consumed 140 ml of either concentrated beetroot juice (nitrate supplementation) or nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (Placebo) 90 minutes before resting seated blood pressure was measured. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring CVC at the forearm, finger and foot during iontophoresis of 1% w/v acetylcholine followed by foot and hand cooling as for Baseline. Plasma nitrite concentrations significantly increased in nitrate supplementation compared to Placebo and Baseline (502 ± 246 nmol.L-1; 73 ± 45 nmol.L-1; 74 ± 49 nmol.L-1 respectively; n=11; P < 0.001). Resting blood pressure and the response to foot and hand cooling did not differ between conditions (all P > 0.05). Nitrate supplementation did not alter endothelial function in the forearm, finger or foot (all P > 0.05) compared to Placebo. Despite a physiologically meaningful rise in plasma nitrite concentrations, acute nitrate supplementation does not alter extremity rewarming, endothelial function or blood pressure in individuals with cold sensitivity.
Description: This paper is in closed access until 20th September 2018.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1016/j.niox.2017.09.005
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/26627
Publisher Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.niox.2017.09.005
ISSN: 1089-8611
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

Files associated with this item:

File Description SizeFormat
Bailey_Beetroot+and+cold+sensitivity+re-submission+final+18-09-2017+clean.pdfAccepted version378.1 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

 

SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.