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Title: Does strength promoting exercise confer unique health benefits? A pooled analysis of eleven population cohorts with all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality endpoints
Authors: Stamatakis, Emmanuel
Lee, I-Min
Bennie, Jason
Freeston, Jonathan
Hamer, Mark
O'Donovan, Gary
Ding, Ding
Bauman, Adrian
Mavros, Yorgi
Keywords: Cancer
Cardiometabolic
Cardiovascular
Epidemiology
Mortality
Physical activity
Resistance training
Strength promoting exercise
Strength training
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: © Oxford University Press (OUP)
Citation: STAMATAKIS, E. ... et al, 2017. Does strength promoting exercise confer unique health benefits? A pooled analysis of eleven population cohorts with all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality endpoints. American Journal of Epidemiology, In Press.
Abstract: Public health guidance includes strength-promoting exercise (SPE) but there is little evidence on its links with mortality. Using data from 11 cohorts we examined the associations between SPE (gym-based and own bodyweight strength activities) and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression examine the associations between SPE (any, low/high volume, adherence to SPE guideline) and mortality. The core sample comprised 80,306 adults aged ≥30 years corresponding to 5,763 any cause deaths (681,790 person years). Following exclusions for prevalent disease/events in the first 24 months, participation in any SPE was favorably associated with all cause (0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.69 to 0.87) and cancer mortality (0.69, 0.56 to 0.86). Adhering only to the SPE guideline of (≥2 sessions/week) was associated with cancer (0.66, 0.48 to 0.92) and all-cause (0.79, 0.66 to 0.94) mortality; adhering only to the aerobic guideline (150 minutes/week of moderate or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity or equivalent combinations) was associated with all-cause (0.84, 0.78 to 0.90) and CVD (0.78, 0.68 to 0.90) mortality. Adherence to both guidelines was associated with all-cause (0.71, 0.57 to 0.87), and cancer (0.70, 0.50 to 0.98) mortality. Our results support promoting adherence to the strength exercise guidelines over and above the generic physical activity targets.
Description: This paper is closed access until 12 months after publication.
Version: Accepted for publication
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/26828
Publisher Link: https://academic.oup.com/aje
ISSN: 0002-9262
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences)

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