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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/27561

Title: Effect of two-year degradation on mechanical interaction between a bioresorbable scaffold and blood vessel
Authors: Qiu, Tianyang
He, R.
Abunassar, C.
Hossainy, S.
Zhao, Liguo
Keywords: Bioresorbable polymeric scaffold
Mechanical interaction
Degradation
Finite element
Vessel remodelling
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: © Elsevier
Citation: QIU, T. ...et al., 2017. Effect of two-year degradation on mechanical interaction between a bioresorbable scaffold and blood vessel. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 78, pp. 254-265.
Abstract: This paper aims to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a bioresorbable polymeric coronary scaffold using finite element method, focusing on scaffold-artery interaction during degradation and vessel remodelling. A series of nonlinear stress-strain responses was constructed to match the experimental measurement of radial stiffness and strength for polymeric scaffolds over 2-year in-vitro degradation times. Degradation process was modelled by incorporating the change of material property as a function of time. Vessel remodelling was realised by changing the size of artery-plaque system manually, according to the clinical data in literature. Over degradation times, stress on the scaffold tended to increase firstly and then decreased gradually, corresponding to the changing yield stress of the scaffold material; whereas the stress on the plaque and arterial layers showed a continuous decrease. In addition, stress reduction was also observed for scaffold, plaque and artery in the simulations with the consideration of vessel remodelling. For the first time, the work offered insights into mechanical interaction between a bioresorbable scaffold and blood vessel during two-year in-vitro degradation, which has significance in assisting with further development of bioresorbable implants for treating cardiovascular diseases.
Description: This paper is in closed access until 21st Nov 2018.
Sponsor: The work was financially supported by Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA.
Version: Accepted for publication
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2017.11.031
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/27561
Publisher Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2017.11.031
ISSN: 1878-0180
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering)

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