Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Loughborough University Institutional Repository

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/31595

Title: Wetland systems: a cheaper and efficient treatment option for food processing waste in Africa
Authors: Adelegan, Joseph
Agbede, O.A.
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: © WEDC, Loughborough University
Citation: ADELEGAN, J. and AGBEDE, O.A., 2011. Wetland systems: a cheaper and efficient treatment option for food processing waste in Africa. IN: Shaw, R.J. (ed). The future of water, sanitation and hygiene in low-income countries - Innovation, adaptation and engagement in a changing world: Proceedings of the 35th WEDC International Conference, Loughborough, UK, 6-8 July 2011, 8pp.
Abstract: The study investigates an alternative wastewater treatment system for the food and beverage industry in Africa. A subsurface flow wetland system was designed and compared with a combination of anaerobic and aerobic bioreactor installed for a brewery in Nigeria. The cost of the designed wetland system is 33% of the cost of installed bioreactor. The waste characteristics for the designed subsurface flow constructed wetland after treatment falls within the USEPA threshold while that of the installed Bioreactor, are above. In addition, the treatment efficiency of the designed subsurface flow constructed wetland for controlling parameters; BOD, TSS and Faecal Coliform are 96.83%, 88.42% and 96.29% respectively while that of the UASB reactor, are 62.94%, 15.36% and 63.81%. Hence, the designed subsurface flow constructed wetland is more efficient in the removal of BOD, TSS and Faecal Coliform and could be an excellent alternative for the food and beverage industry in Africa.
Description: This is a conference paper.
Version: Published
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/31595
Appears in Collections:WEDC 35th International Conference

Files associated with this item:

File SizeFormat
Adelegan-J-1038.pdf161.61 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

 

SFX Query

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.