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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/4426

Title: Modelling gas flow pressure gradients in gelcast ceramic foam diesel particulate filters
Authors: Adigio, E.M.
Binner, J.G.P.
Garner, Colin P.
Hague, Richard J.M.
Williams, Andrew M.
Keywords: Fluid flow
Diesel
Engine
Particulate
Filter
Pressure
Exhaust
Model
Aftertreatment
Emissions
Ceramic foam
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: © Professional Engineering Publishing
Citation: ADIGIO, E.M. ... et al., 2008. Modelling gas flow pressure gradients in gelcast ceramic foam diesel particulate filters. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering, 222 (8), pp. 1471-1487
Abstract: New mathematical models are proposed that predict fluid flow pressure gradients in gelcast ceramic foam diesel exhaust particulate filters by considering the foam structure conceptually as serially connected orifices. The resulting multiple orifice mathematical (MOM) model is based on the sum of a viscous term derived from an extended Ergun model and the kinetic energy loss derived from the Bernoulli and conservation of mass equations. The MOM model was calibrated using experimental data obtained from measuring the air flowrate and pressure drop across a physical large-scale three-dimensional model of a cellular foam structure produced using rapid manufacturing techniques. The calibrated model was then validated using fluid flow data obtained from gelcast ceramic foam filters of various cell sizes and was found to require no empirical recalibration for each gelcast ceramic foam sample. The MOM model for clean filters was extended to predict pressure gradients of filters loaded with particulate matter (PM). The prediction of pressure gradients through gelcast ceramic filters using the MOM model for clean and PM-loaded cases was shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The models were finally applied to design a filter for a turbocharged, charge-cooled, 2.0 l, fourstroke, common rail, direct injection passenger car diesel engine.
Description: This article was published in the journal, Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering [© Professional Engineering Publishing]. The definitive version is available at: http://journals.pepublishing.com/content/119783/?sortorder=asc&v=editorial&p_o=0
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1243/09544070JAUTO508
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/4426
ISSN: 0954-4070
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering)
Published Articles (Materials)

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