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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/4496

Title: An experimental study of the dual-fuel performance of a small compression ignition diesel engine operating with three gaseous fuels
Authors: Stewart, Jill
Clarke, Andrew
Chen, Rui
Keywords: Dual-fuel
Alternative gaseous fuels
Three-zone heat release analysis
Combustion phasing
Carbon dioxide (CO2) reductions
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: © IMechE / Professional Engineering Publishing
Citation: STEWART, J., CLARKE, A.A. and CHEN, R., 2007. An experimental study of the dual-fuel performance of a small compression ignition diesel engine operating with three gaseous fuels. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering, 221(8), pp. 943-956.
Abstract: A dual-fuel engine is a compression ignition (CI) engine where the primary gaseous fuel source is premixed with air as it enters the combustion chamber. This homogenous mixture is ignited by a small quantity of diesel, the ‘pilot’, that is injected towards the end of the compression stroke. In the present study, a direct-injection CI engine, was fuelled with three different gaseous fuels: methane, propane, and butane. The engine performance at various gaseous concentrations was recorded at 1500 r/min and quarter, half, and three-quarters relative to full a load of 18.7 kW. In order to investigate the combustion performance, a novel three-zone heat release rate analysis was applied to the data. The resulting heat release rate data are used to aid understanding of the performance characteristics of the engine in dual-fuel mode. Data are presented for the heat release rates, effects of engine load and speed, brake specific energy consumption of the engine, and combustion phasing of the three different primary gaseous fuels. Methane permitted the maximum energy substitution, relative to diesel, and yielded the most significant reductions in CO2. However, propane also had significant reductions in CO2 but had an increased diffusional combustion stage which may lend itself to the modern high-speed direct-injection engine.
Description: This article has been published in the journal, Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering [© PEP]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1243/09544070JAUTO458
Version: Published
DOI: 10.1243/09544070JAUTO458
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/4496
ISSN: 0954-4070
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering)

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