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Title: Lowering the outdoor temperature in high-rise high-density residential developments of coastal Hong Kong: the vegetation influence
Authors: Giridharan, Renganathan
Lau, S.S.Y.
Ganesan, S.
Givoni, B.
Keywords: On-site variables
Urban heat island intensity (UHI)
Tree cover
Shrub cover
Peak summer clear sky days (PSCS-days)
Peak summer partially cloudy days (PSPC-days)
Late summer days
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: © Elsevier
Citation: GIRIDHARAN, R. ... et al, 2008. Lowering the outdoor temperature in high-rise high-density residential developments of coastal Hong Kong: the vegetation influence. Building and Environment, 43 (10), pp. 1583–1595.
Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of on-site variables on the influence of vegetation in lowering outdoor temperature. The study uses six critical on-site variables such as surface albedo, sky view factor, altitude, shrub cover, tree cover and average height to floor area ratio to carry out analysis in five data sets. The climatic parameters and physical characteristics were measured and surveyed, respectively in 216 stations in high-rise high-density residential developments of coastal Hong Kong. The data set is mainly categorised into peak summer clear sky days (PSCS-days), peak summer partially cloudy days (PSPC-days) and late summer days to address the issues related to cloudy sky conditions in Hong Kong. The trend analysis shows that at a lower sky view factor, ranging from 0.1 to 0.25, shrub cover as low as 10–15% in a 1000m2 open area is more effective in reducing outdoor temperature than the same level of tree cover in a location with a higher sky view factor (0.4 or above). The regression models used in this study were able to explain the influence of on-site variables on vegetation in lowering the outdoor temperature within the respective urban settings. In high-rise high-density environments, on-site variables such as sky view factor and altitude have a substantial impact on the influence of vegetation in lowering outdoor temperature. However, off-site variables such as high urban density and anthropogenic heat could negate the behaviour of sky view factor and altitude. The study suggests that increasing the tree cover from 25% to 40% in the pocket parks in coastal area residential developments of Hong Kong could reduce daytime urban heat island intensity (UHI) by further 0.5 1C.
Description: This article is closed access. It was published in the journal, Building and Environment [© Elsevier] and the definitive version is available at: www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Version: Closed access
DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2007.10.003
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/5735
ISSN: 0360-1323
Appears in Collections:Closed Access (Civil and Building Engineering)

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