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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/6926

Title: The financial system and economic growth in the United Kingdom: a disaggregated time series approach
Authors: Jobome, Gregory Ovie
Keywords: Financial development
Banking
Stock markets
Economic growth
Manufacturing
Services
United Kingdom
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: © Gregory Ovie Jobome
Abstract: This thesis examines the relationship between the development of the financial system and economic growth in the United Kingdom, using a time series econometric methodology. It extends the existing literature in three ways. First, it applies a disaggregated approach, testing the relationship not only at the aggregate level, but also for the manufacturing and service sectors of the UK. This allows the modeling to be driven by the financial characteristics of each sector, thereby providing a firmer foundation for policy recommendations. Second, `fmance-augmented' production functions are estimated throughout, thus yielding coefficients that are theoretically consistent and interpretable. The empirical results suggest that the aggregate economy faces decreasing returns to scale, the manufacturing sector exhibits increasing returns to scale while the service sector appears to display either constant or decreasing returns. Third, both these innovations mean that the study is also able to make a contribution to the on-going sectoral productivity and policy debates in the UK, emphasising the role of finance in this process. The study finds evidence that the evolution of the finance-output relationship in the UK is sector-specific, in that the development of the stock market is positively associated with long-run output, both at the aggregate level and for the manufacturing sector, whereas banking sector development is found to be important for service sector output.
Description: A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy of Loughborough University.
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/6926
Appears in Collections:PhD Theses (Business School)

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