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Title: A stemming algorithm for Latvian
Authors: Kreslins, Karlis
Keywords: Information science & librarianship
Stemming algorithm
Latvian
Issue Date: 1996
Publisher: © Karlis Kreslins
Abstract: The thesis covers construction, application and evaluation of a stemming algorithm for advanced information searching and retrieval in Latvian databases. Its aim is to examine the following two questions: Is it possible to apply for Latvian a suffix removal algorithm originally designed for English? Can stemming in Latvian produce the same or better information retrieval results than manual truncation? In order to achieve these aims, the role and importance of automatic word conflation both for document indexing and information retrieval are characterised. A review of literature, which analyzes and evaluates different types of stemming techniques and retrospective development of stemming algorithms, justifies the necessity to apply this advanced IR method also for Latvian. Comparative analysis of morphological structure both for English and Latvian language determined the selection of Porter's suffix removal algorithm as a basis for the Latvian sternmer. An extensive list of Latvian stopwords including conjunctions, particles and adverbs, was designed and added to the initial sternmer in order to eliminate insignificant words from further processing. A number of specific modifications and changes related to the Latvian language were carried out to the structure and rules of the original stemming algorithm. Analysis of word stemming based on Latvian electronic dictionary and Latvian text fragments confirmed that the suffix removal technique can be successfully applied also to Latvian language. An evaluation study of user search statements revealed that the stemming algorithm to a certain extent can improve effectiveness of information retrieval.
Description: A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy of Loughborough University.
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/7433
Appears in Collections:PhD Theses (Information Science)

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