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Title: Can the activity matching ability system contribute to employment assessment? An initial discussion of job performance and a survey of work psychologists views
Authors: Birkin, Richard
Haines, Victoria
Hitchcock, David
Fox, David
Edwards, Nick
Duckworth, Stephen
Gleeson, Rosie
Navarro, Tanya
Hondroudakis, Anna
Foy, Tony
Meehan, Michael
Keywords: activity matching ability service (AMAS)
employment assessment (EA)
ergonomics
job performance
job analysis (JA)
incapacity benefit (IB)
work psychologist (WP)
Issue Date: 2004
Publisher: © DWP
Citation: BIRKIN, R., ET AL. 2004. Can the activity matching ability system contribute to employment assessment? An initial discussion of job performance and a survey of work psychologists views. Journal of Occupational Psychology, Employment and Disability , 6(2), pp. 51-66
Abstract: Employment Assessment (EA) is concerned with enabling individuals to predict their performance in job opportunities. Job performance and its analysis are key concerns for organisational psychology, although progress is required to develop their utility for EA client work. The Activity Matching Ability System (AMAS) assesses job activities and individuals' abilities and may contribute to EA. In order to begin to explore this possibility, and whether other significant factors might improve EA, a survey was run in parallel with a sample of Work Psychologist (WP) interviews (n=238). Interviewee characteristics (age, ethnic background, etc.) and WP estimates of impact of disability and probability of obtaining employment indicated a varied group, younger than other samples. WPs found that AMAS would enhance EA for one fifth of the sample. AMAS could contribute by aiding exploration of physical and cognitive factors, by providing a focus for assessment, by reviewing what individuals can do at work and by helping confidence. They considered EA would be improved by developing assessments of interpersonal skills, team working, job specific skills and aptitudes, and work placements. Cross tabulation of the data indicated that WP views were not significantly associated with any of the factors researched.
Description: This article has been published in the journal, Journal of Occupational Psychology, Employment and Disability [© DWP].
URI: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/908
ISSN: 1740-4193
Appears in Collections:Published Articles (Design School)

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